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Doctor Visit

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According to these blood tests, you're like 30% cereal.
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matthewmascari
4 days ago
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Jimmy Fallon uses the Force to finally kill the All Star meme

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I regret to inform you that Smash Mouth’s song “All Star” has died — again. This time, the pop single was murdered in cold, corporate blood by Jimmy Fallon, NBC, and Disney (by way of Star Wars). Above, you can see officially released footage of the brutal act.

WARNING: it is graphic.

“All Star” lived a blessed and full second life as an internet meme thanks to reincarnations like Windows XP “All Star,” "All Star" by Smash Mouth but every word is someBODY, “All Star” sung backwards, “All Star” by Smash Mouth but every other word is "bee" from Bee Movie and the instrumental is Seinfeld, “All Star” but the words are ordered by Scrabble score, “Photograph” by Nickelback but every word is someBODY, “All Star” but every word is in...

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matthewmascari
17 days ago
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Babylon 5 now available to stream for free in the US

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Babylon 5, even during its original run, was never particularly easy to watch when it first aired. The changing TV landscape of the time, as well as the failure of B5's original network PTEN and subsequent re-emergence on the TNT network, meant that timeslots and airdates shifted several times during the show's original five-year run.

Show creator Joe Michael Sraczynski's "B5 books" site is reporting that Go90.com now has the entire show available to stream for free for the first time, along with several other recent series.

I've always believed that B5 represented one of the better Sci-Fi "space opera" TV shows in history, and one that many people were never able to watch during its run on television. The story and effects hold up extremely well for a show that recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. Now's your chance to see it in its entirety, for free, on your own terms.

Unfortunately, the site is US-only.

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matthewmascari
19 days ago
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1 public comment
wmorrell
22 days ago
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RIP Richard Biggs, Andreas Katsulas, Jerry Doyle. Yay B5 streaming!
duerig
21 days ago
One of my favorites. Though the arc involving a change in leadership, the usage of aliens as enemy scapegoats, and creeping fascism sounds much less hypthetical than is used to be.

You're not going to believe what I'm about to tell you

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You're not going to believe what I'm about to tell you

This is a comic about the backfire effect.

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matthewmascari
19 days ago
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4 public comments
chrishiestand
22 days ago
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so good, so timely
San Diego, CA, USA
MaryEllenCG
22 days ago
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This is super interesting, and very helpful.
Greater Bostonia
duerig
22 days ago
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Hmm. This was interesting up until it got into the evo-psych explanation at the end. Yes, we probably did evolve to dismiss ideas that threaten our core beliefs. But like almost any pattern of thought, it is both a consistent bias and a reasonable thing to do most of the time.

It is completely rational to be slow to change your beliefs when faced with new evidence. It is also completely rational to respond to intellectual threats with hostility and retrenchment. At the same time, these completely rational responses can also lead us to reject compelling evidence in some circumstances.

Why are these responses rational? First, because conversation, books, articles, and speeches are all very weak evidence. I've got a mountain of experience behind me informing my beliefs. And somebody has just added a metaphorical pebble. Occasionally, it might cause a landslide resulting in a profound change in my understanding of the world. But most of the time it does not. If somebody changes their mind every time they hear an assertion, we tend to think of them as foolish and credulous. And for good reason.

I have heard assertions throughout my life. Some of them were true and many of them were false. I have to evaluate this assertion to get a sense of how probable it is.

Second, There is no fundamental way for me to perceive whether an assertion is true or false just by looking at it. Instead, I have to make a judgement based on the my previous beliefs and experiences (also known as pre-existing biases) and how much I trust the person making the assertion (also known as accepting an argument from authority). In a formal logic sense, both of these are clearly fallacies. But they are all I have to go on. So I have to use these tools to make sense of the assertion. If the assertion fits comfortably in the house of my core beliefs and I have a certain amount of trust in the asserter, then I might be willing to accept it. Otherwise, I will be likely to reject it.

Now let's say that somebody said something that sounds absurd. 'Absurd' is just another name for something that doesn't fit my core beliefs. In that case, I would likely reject it out of hand. And I would also feel threatened. I would likely downgrade the source. I might even become angry because a common cause of false assertions is that somebody is trying to trick me. Maybe they want me to look foolish or they want to defraud me.

Now the difficulty is that these reactions are reasonable whether or not my core beliefs are true. So if I come to have a core set of beliefs that happens to be incorrect (which is almost certainly true to some extent or another), then this rule of thumb can prevent me from replacing them with better core beliefs that are more true.

I think that the answer has to be somewhere in the middle. We should not be changing our beliefs every time we hear a countervailing assertion. But it is also important to seek out different perspectives on those beliefs. If there are no fresh inlets, our core beliefs will be stagnant intellectual swamps. But if we accept new assertions too readily, then we become a river with each new idea passing through and then replaced by the next and we have no possibility of retaining truth.

And it is important to use this kind of thought process as a form of self-improvement rather than as an argumentative bludgeon. It is far too easy to read about some fallacy or bias and then use it as a reason to find your opponent 'irrational' rather than using it as a tool for yourself.
deezil
22 days ago
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THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS ALL DAY THIS.
Louisville, Kentucky

The Sandwich Alignment Chart (cue John Hodgman's exploding head!)

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@matttomic's Sandwich Alignment Chart isn't just an amusing and thought-provoking taxonomy of sandwiches (though it certainly is that!). (more…)

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matthewmascari
21 days ago
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The Simpsons Took On Donald Trump's 100 First Days and It Was Expectedly Ridiculous

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Submitted by: (via Animation on FOX)

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matthewmascari
27 days ago
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